Thursday, April 6, 2017

Newsprint Ads Related to Health

About the only people who still read newspapers are the elderly so it is not a surprise that ads in newspapers almost exclusively focus on topics of interest to the elderly. Here is a review of some ads in newspapers

Thew NY State Nurses Association ad  highlights the health support features of Medicaid to a target market of elderly. The apparent value proposition is that if changes to Medicaid are resisted these benefits will remain; if not they will go away. It engages the user via a small healthy child and teddy bear and text based please to support the needs of children, the elderly and the disabled. The ads call to action is probably related to voting or contacting a politician since both are done frequently by the elderly or to check out a website and is expected to yield the benefit of no change to health services for the respondent. I believe the ad targets the elderly because almost all Medicaid funds primarily help the elderly with home care and nursing home costs. I feel the objective was not really measurable nor attainable. Highlighting value to children of the poor and the disabled ads emotional appeal but these are not large voting blocks and ignore the more clear value of Medicaid to the elderly, support for them when they become ill or infirm.

The Generation Solutions newspaper ad highlights ability of the home health care service to help the elderly with improving "gait speed" to a target market of professional caregivers and primary care providers. The apparent value proposition is that the services will confer a lower risk of mortality to the patients of the market by addressing gait limitations. It engages the user via a frail looking elderly woman (whose life will not end prematurely) and non-emotional data/results related to a study. The ads call to action is to contact the agency and is expected to yield the benefit to the respondent that a patient's gait speed is improved. I feel the objective was measurable in terms of increased calls although not especially attainable unless this ad was in a newspaper only seen by health care providers (which is possible). It would be more effective as an ad targeting family caregivers which had less data and said "talk to your loved one's physician about gait - it could help her recover and avoid a repeat fall".

The Carolina Select Home Care newspaper ad highlights the quality of their agency to a target market of the elderly with a physical condition and certified nurse assistants. The apparent value proposition is the elderly will receive high quality care and the nurse assistant will work in a better facility. It engages the user via a picture of a healthy and smiling older person with the assumption that their service achieves such an outcome. The ads call to action is to call a phone number and is expected to yield the benefit of learning about an environment that is good for the elderly person or a nice place to work. I feel the objective was measurable by following call rates after placement of the ad and quite attainable. The one limitation is the ad has two targets. It seems more logical to run two different ads with a more clear focus and see which one is more effective.

The Renew Home Healthcare newspaper ad highlights the comfort and zero cost of their agency to a target market of the elderly with a physical condition. The apparent value proposition is the elderly person will receive more comfort and achieve higher independence if they use their services. It engages the user via a picture tidy home and friendly young home health care person, further supporting an emotion of calm and ease. The ads call to action is to call a phone number and is expected to yield the benefit of learning about an environment that will promote their healthy return to independence . I feel the objective was measurable by following call rates after placement of the ad and quite attainable. The ad has a simple message and focuses on the fact that making a choice will not incur costs.

The Overactive Bladder research study newspaper ad highlights the problems of an overactive bladder and by implication implies that by participating in the study the elderly enrollee will potentially gain access to a medication that might help. The apparent value proposition is potential relief from the effects of an overactive bladder (incontinence). It engages the user via a woman who looks troubled and a smiling man. The ads call to action is to call a phone number and is expected to yield no cost for treatment and possible compensation. I feel the objective was easily measurable by phone call records and probably attainable. Since there is a change the person gets a placebo I feel it would be helpful to highlight how participation could help others by learning something new. Also I would expect that some compensation would be received by all participants. If so that should be a clear benefit of participating in the study.

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